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Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association   

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SPRING
SEMINAR

May 3rd, 2018

 

 

Vapor Intrusion

 

This year’s MSECA Spring Seminar on Vapor Intrusion will focus on three areas: Updated Investigation and Remediation Methods with real world case studies, Preferential Pathway Vapor Migration through Sewers, and regulatory updates. The Seminar will also include the most updated EPA research around indicators, tracers, and surrogates (ITS), which include a collection of quantifiable metrics and tools that may have the potential for making VI pathway assessment and long-term monitoring more informative, efficient, and cost-effective.

We will have a number of great presentations including:

  • Evidence of a Sewer Vapor Transport Pathway: Findings from Work Performed at the Indianapolis USEPA Research Duplex
    Rob Uppencamp, Arcadis U.S., Inc.

  • High Volume Sampling: An Innovative Tool for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Design (a Case Study)
    Bryan VanDuinen, PE, Geosyntec Consultants

  • Quantifiable Lines of Evidence for Chemical Vapor Intrusion
    Chase Holton, Ph.D., Jacobs

  • Real Time Indoor Air Monitoring and Source Identification during Thermal Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents
    Monica Williamson, Hull & Associates

  • Regulatory-Directed Combined Remedy Approach for Chlorinated Vapor Intrusion/Mitigation and Groundwater Remediation under a Residential Neighborhood
    Nick Mjolsness, Land Science Technology

  • Selection, Installation and Quality Procedures for Vapor Mitigation Barrier Systems Description
    Chuck Hornaday, Vadose Remediation Technologies

  • Sorbent Sampling Options with an Emphasis on Passive Sampling
    Rob Uppencamp, Arcadis U.S., Inc.

  • State of Science – the Sewer Gas to Indoor Air Pathway
    Aaron Friedrich, ERM

  • Summary of State Approaches to Vapor Intrusion – 2018 Update
    Richard Rago, Haley & Aldrich

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WHEN:

Thursday, May 3rd
Registration Opens at 7:00am
8:00am - 4:30pm


WHERE:
Regions Tower - 5th Floor
One Indiana Square
Indianapolis, IN 46204

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MSECA would like to thank the following sponsors for their support: Button_-_Sponsor_Info_Block.jpg

Primary Event Sponsor
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Lunch Sponsor
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Bag Sponsor
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MSECA Seminar Registration:

Sign up for:

Before
Apr 23rd

Before
Apr 30th

Onsite
(After 4/29)

 

MSECA Member Registration
Check your company's status at:
http://www.mseca.org/MSECA_Members.php
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Environmental consulting companies can Join MSECA and all employees will receive discounted registration to all our educational events.
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MSECA Government Member Registration
Government Members receive discount on registration.
(Currently IDEM & Indiana Brownfields are both MSECA Members)
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Full time students who join MSECA at our Student Member rate receive a discount on registration.
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Non-Member Government / Student Registration
MSECA offers a discount on registration to non-members who are government employees or full time students. A current ID card maybe requested to verify eligibility for this rate.
Sign Up for MSECA Membership and Receive a Bigger Discount
$115.00 $135.00 $165.00

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Presentation Descriptions:

Evidence of a Sewer Vapor Transport Pathway: Findings from Work Performed at the Indianapolis USEPA Research Duplex
Rob Uppencamp, Arcadis U.S., Inc.

The role of sewer lines as preferential pathways for vapor intrusion is poorly understood. Although the importance of sewer lines for volatile organic compound (VOC) transport has been documented at a small number of sites with vapor intrusion, sewer lines are not routinely sampled during most vapor intrusion investigations. The vapor intrusion pathway has been thoroughly studied at the USEPA Research Duplex over several years. The importance of the sewer pathway was not identified during prior studies of the duplex. This presentation describes the methods used by a group of scientists to study the sewer pathway and provides evidence of gas migration from the sewer to the duplex.

High Volume Sampling: An Innovative Tool for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Design (a Case Study)
Bryan VanDuinen, PE, Geosyntec Consultants

During the evaluation of vapor intrusion (VI) risks at a large, active manufacturing facility impacted by trichloroethene (TCE), the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality began revising its cleanup criteria rules. The draft cleanup criteria were developed using a lower nonresidential indoor air screening level (IASL) for TCE. Based on potential risk, a vapor mitigation system was selected to reduce indoor air concentrations below the draft IASL. High volume sampling (HVS) provided a quick and cost-effective way to characterize sub-slab impacts across a large area and obtain data for mitigation system design.

Quantifiable Lines of Evidence for Chemical Vapor Intrusion
Chase Holton, Ph.D., Jacobs

The assessment of vapor intrusion (VI) is complicated by variability, across both space and time. This is largely due to compounded variability from the many individual factors that influence the vapor migration pathway from subsurface source to indoor air. Past research on highly variable indoor air data sets have demonstrated that conventional sampling schemes can result in false negative and false positive decisions. While continuous chemical analysis of individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is conceptually appealing, it remains largely impractical when a number of buildings are involved and particularly for long-term monitoring. As more is learned about the challenges with indoor air sampling for VI assessment it has become clear that alternative approaches are needed to help guide discrete sampling efforts and reduce sampling requirements while improving confidence in exposure characterization. Indicators, tracers, and surrogates (ITS), which include a collection of quantifiable metrics and tools, have been suggested as a potential solution for making VI pathway assessment and long-term monitoring more informative, efficient, and cost-effective. This presentation will provide a critical evaluation and quantitative analysis of the application of ITS to better understand the VI pathway and improve exposure characterization.

Real Time Indoor Air Monitoring and Source Identification during Thermal Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents
Monica Williamson, Hull & Associates

A case study is presented where continuous, long-term, real-time monitoring of the indoor air at an operating industrial facility undergoing thermal remediation of chlorinated solvents was conducted to characterize potential sources of fugitive emissions. Continuous monitoring using gas chromatograph/electron capture detector (GC/ECD) instrumentation was implemented after routine indoor air sampling indicated elevated concentrations of site chemicals of concern in indoor air to identify potential sources and characterize variability in indoor air concentrations across the facility.

Regulatory-Directed Combined Remedy Approach for Chlorinated Vapor Intrusion/Mitigation and Groundwater Remediation under a Residential Neighborhood
Nick Mjolsness, Land Science Technology

In 2009, the MDEQ began state-funded activities at an industrial plating facility in southwest Michigan to determine the nature and extent of contamination emanating from an area of the facility where degreasing agents were used. The results of the investigation identified chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC)-impacted groundwater in a ¼ mile long shallow plume ranging from 2-5 feet in depth migrating from the site and through a residential area. Further investigation of the residences identified contaminated groundwater within many of the basements and sumps, posing a potential vapor intrusion threat as well. Additionally, assessment of the nearby storm water system indicated infiltration of contaminated groundwater which was discharging into the East Branch of the Paw Paw River. This presentation will review the approach & activities to address these concerns and the results.

Selection, Installation and Quality Procedures for Vapor Mitigation Barrier Systems Description
Chuck Hornaday, Vadose Remediation Technologies

This session will provide an overview and comparison of various material options for use as a vapor mitigation barrier. Criteria for selection of active and passive venting systems, pre-formed membranes and spray-applied membranes will be provided. Typical installation methods for each of the options will be provided including standard details. A review of proper quality control procedures for the various systems will also be provided. This presentation will provide attendees with knowledge of the various components and systems for vapor mitigation systems to better equip them to select and ensure proper quality control measures are taken during the installation of these systems.

Sorbent Sampling Options with an Emphasis on Passive Sampling
Rob Uppencamp, Arcadis U.S., Inc.

Historically, stainless-steel canisters have been the most commonly used method for collecting indoor air and soil gas samples. Active sampling onto sorbent tubes, such as USEPA Compendium Method TO-17, has started to gain traction in recent years for vapor intrusion sampling. Passive sorbent samplers have been used historically for industrial hygiene/exposure monitoring. Passive sorbent samplers have been the default method for air monitoring in Europe for many years. More recently, the use of passive samplers for vapor intrusion sampling has been garnering more and more attention in the US. Several passive sorbent sampler options and sampling techniques are currently available for indoor air and soil gas. Several studies have been performed and literature published on the use and reliability of passive samplers. The presentation will introduce the basics of passive sampler theory and design; discuss the various passive samplers that are available; discuss the benefits, applications, and limitations of passive samplers; and present comparison studies between various passive samplers and passive samplers and other sampling methods. Additionally, the appropriate type of sorbent media will be discussed based on target analytes for both passive and active sorbent sampling.

Summary of State Approaches to Vapor Intrusion – 2018 Update
Richard Rago, Haley & Aldrich

Regulatory requirements for the evaluation of vapor intrusion (VI) vary significantly among states. For site owners and responsible parties that have sites in different regulatory jurisdictions, one challenge is to know and understand how the requirements or expectations for VI differ from one jurisdiction to the next. Differences in requirements can make it difficult to manage sites in a consistent manner between jurisdictions. Eklund, Folkes, Kabel, and Farnum published an overview of state guidance for VI in 2007 that provided a useful summary of pathway screening values and other key VI policies. An update by Eklund, Beckley, Yates, and McHugh was published in 2012. Since that time, numerous states have revised their guidance and some states that did not have VI-specific guidance have issued new guidance. This presentation provides an update to the 2012 study.

For each state, the review includes tabulations of the types of screening values included (e.g., groundwater, soil, soil gas, indoor air), the screening values for selected chemicals that commonly drive VI investigations (i.e., TCE, PCE, and benzene), and the risk levels used for cancer and non-cancer risk. Federal values are included for comparison. In addition, for each state, we summarize a number of key policy decisions that are important for the investigation of VI, including distance screening criteria, default subsurface to indoor air attenuation factors, policies for evaluation of petroleum VI, and policies for evaluation of indoor sources of VOCs.


Presenter Bios:

Mike Habeck, IDEM

Mike Habeck works for IDEM in the Office of Land Quality, where his responsibilities include staff training and policy development. Past IDEM roles include chemist, remediation project manager (VRP, Superfund, Brownfields), risk assessor, and section chief. He was part of the IDEM team that worked on the Remediation Closure Guide (RCG), and is currently working with another IDEM team that is drafting a preliminary revision of the RCG.

Chase Holton, Ph.D., Jacobs

Dr. Chase Holton, is an environmental engineer with Jacobs (previously CH2M) in Denver, Colorado. He specializes in contaminant fate and transport, including the assessment and mitigation of the vapor intrusion (VI) pathway. Prior to joining CH2M in June 2015, Chase was a graduate research assistant at Arizona State University working with Dr. Paul C. Johnson on a series of long-term VI monitoring studies at a well-known research house in Utah. Chase is currently involved with a number of ongoing VI research projects for USEPA, DoD, and others, including recent research on the use of indicators, tracers, and surrogates in VI assessments.

Chuck Hornaday, Vadose Remediation Technologies

Chuck is the president of Vadose Remediation Technologies a Midwestern United States based company and provider of technologies for the remediation of contaminated soil, groundwater and sediments. Their mission is to provide responsive technical support to ensure the proper design and application of their remedial technologies. Chuck has over 25 years of experience in the environmental field and has developed a keen understanding of relevant technologies. He is a geologist with a BS degree from the University of Wisconsin Madison and has authored numerous papers on topics including sediment remediation, mine reclamation, thermal remediation.

Nick Mjolsness, Land Science Technology

Nick Mjolsness is a technical sales expert with years of experience in vapor intrusion (VI) mitigation, specializing in assisting clients with solutions for the redevelopment of brownfield properties. Nick has been actively involved in the application of Geo-Seal, Vapor Vent and Retro-Coat on projects across the US and offers a high level of service and support to his clients. Nick holds a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree from DePaul University and is active in promoting the value of VI mitigation solutions at conference and events throughout the remediation industry.

Rob Uppencamp, Arcadis U.S., Inc.

Rob Uppencamp is a senior scientist and human health risk assessor with Arcadis out of the Indianapolis, Indiana office. Rob has over 22 years of experience in environmental consulting and specializes in assessing and mitigating the migration of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapor from the sub-surface environment into buildings and in the assessment of human health risks associated with inhalation exposure. Rob has provided vapor intrusion technical and regulatory leadership on hundreds of projects throughout United States, Canada, South America, Asia, Europe, and the Bahamas. He has authored and co-authored numerous presentations and publications under USEPA and for multiple national and international conferences.

Bryan VanDuinen, PE, Geosyntec Consultants

Bryan VanDuinen is a professional environmental engineer specializing in: assessing, remediating, and closing sites impacted by chlorinated solvents, petroleum hydrocarbons, and metals; geographic information systems (GIS); data management, analysis, and visualization; and mathematical modeling. He has worked with clients and regulators, pursuing risk-based closure for sites with NAPL and VI risks. Mr. VanDuinen is Geosyntec’s GIS representative for the Great Lakes branch and VI point of contact for Michigan. Mr. VanDuinen has a Master’s degree in environmental engineering and a Bachelor’s degree in civil & environmental engineering, both from the University of Michigan.

Monica Williamson, Hull & Associates

Monica Williamson is a Project Manager and Risk Assessor with Hull & Associates, Inc. in Dublin, Ohio. She has over 15 years of experience preparing environmental site assessments, multi-media human health and ecological risk assessments and remedial action plans. Ms. Williamson has extensive experience with the USEPA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Superfund program and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Voluntary Action Program (VAP) and Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) programs, the Maryland Department of the Environment Voluntary Cleanup Program, Indiana Department of Environmental Management cleanup programs, and federal RCRA Corrective Action programs. She provides technical oversight on the evaluation of multiple aspects of chemical fate and transport, including the bioavailability and leaching behavior of contaminants, vapor intrusion evaluations, and attenuation of chemicals in groundwater. Ms. Williamson holds a Master of Science in Soil Science, emphasis in Environmental Chemistry, and a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources from The Ohio State University.

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