Home Page Join MSECA MSECA Members Online Education Board of Directors About Us
MSECA Home Page
Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association   

Conference on Environmental Liabilities,
Risk Assessment, and Remediation


A conference dedicated to advancing the professional competence of attendees through education and dissemination of environmental information relevant to the world’s leading businesses.

Takeaways from the Conference:

  • Technical sessions focused on identifying and quantifying environmental liabilities, evaluating environmental risks and effecting remediation and risk management

  • New tools and techniques for site investigation, remediation, and risk evaluations

  • Recent updates to regulatory guidance and statutes

  • Emerging contaminants and how they potentially may be impacting businesses

  • Collaboration with clients, regulators, colleagues, and vendors


WHEN:

Thursday, December 12th
    7:00am - 6:30pm
Friday, December 13th
    7:00am - 1:00pm

WHERE:
Sheraton Indianapolis Hotel
at Keystone Crossing
8787 Keystone Crossing
Indianapolis, IN 46240


Button_-_Reg_Options.jpg


Button_-_ConferenceSchedule.jpg


Button_-_PresentationDescriptions.jpg


Button_-_Presenter_Bios.jpg


MSECA would like to thank the following sponsors for their support:
     
 

Program Sponsor
Logo_-_Microbac.jpg

 

Logo_-_Pace.jpg

 

Logo_-_LSAI_Labs.jpg

 
 

Logo_-_Provectus.png

  Logo_-_PeroxyChem.jpg  

Logo_-_GPRS.jpg

 
 

Logo_-_Regenesis.jpg

 

Logo_-_Directed_Technologies_Drilling.gif

 

Logo_-_Dakota.jpg

 
 

Logo_-_LWR.png

 

Logo_-_ERC.jpg

 

Logo_-_E-Tank-E-Pump.jpg

 
 

Logo_-_Alpha.PNG

 

Logo_-_Prism_Geoimaging.jpg

     
Button_-_Sponsor_Info.jpg


Conference Registration:

Register before Monday, December 9th to attend the Conference at following discounted rates:

  Member Non-Member
Conference Registration

Check your company's status at:

http://www.mseca.org/MSECA_Members.php

Environmental consulting companies can Join MSECA and all employees will receive discounted registration to all our educational events.

$365.00


Button_-_Register_Online_Block.jpg


$465.00


Button_-_Register_Online_Block.jpg


Industry Professionals Registration


Related environmental professionals, such as Health & Safety or Environmental Compliance Managers, who wouldn't qualify for Consultant Membership or Associate (Vendor / Supplier) Membership, but would still benefit from the education, are invited to attend the Conference at a discounted rate.
$365.00

Button_-_Register_Online.jpg

  Member Non-Member

Government / Regulator Registration


Government Members
receive discount on registration.

(Note: Currently IDEM & Indiana Brownfields are both MSECA Members)

$245.00

Button_-_Register_Online_Block.jpg

$265.00

Button_-_Register_Online_Block.jpg
  Member Non-Member

Student Registration


Full time students who join MSECA at our Student Member rate receive a discount on registration.

$175.00

Button_-_Register_Online_Block.jpg


$195.00

Button_-_Register_Online_Block.jpg


Conference Schedule:

Start Time


Thursday, December 12th

7:00 AM Registration / Breakfast
7:30 AM
8:00 AM

Risk Assessment Challenges Associated
with Atmospheric Transport of PFAS
Laura Trozzolo, TRC Companies, Inc.

Biochar as a low-cost alternative for
remediation of metals and organic compounds
Bernd W. Rehm, ReSolution Partners

8:30 AM

Use of a New Liquid Activated Carbon
Amendment
to Cost-Effectively Address
High Dissolved-Phase
Petroleum
Hydrocarbons in Groundwater

Steve Sittler, Patriot Engineering

Combined Remedy Implementation:
Alkaline Activated Persulfate with
In Situ Solidification/Stabilization
(ISCO-ISS) in a Single Application

John Valkenburg, PeroxyChem

9:00 AM
9:30 AM


Session Break / Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM

Rapid Soil Vapor Plume Delineation
for Vapor Intrusion Investigations

Jennifer Simms, Jacobs

Emulsified Vegetable Oil Delivery and
Challenges in Fractured Karstic Bedrock

Raymond Vaské, AECOM

10:30 AM
11:00 AM

Chlorinated Solvent Forensics:
Applying Multiple Lines of Evidence
Joshua Richards, Pace Analytical

Simply cook it: Above-ground removal
of PFAS from solids at 350 - 400°C

Lauren Soos, TRS Group, Inc

11:30 AM Lunch / Exhibit Hall
12:00 PM
12:30 PM
1:00 PM

Quality of life performances
considerations while conducting
construction and remediation projects

Will Elcoate, Alpha Analytical

Incoming! Utilizing In-Situ
Bioremediation in a
Commingled
Plume with an Uncontrolled Source

Rob Ferree, CPG & Ryan Fimmen, PhD,
Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.

1:30 PM
2:00 PM

Cost-effective Source Area
Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium

David Beck, Tetra Tech

Remediation of 1,1,2 - TCA and
Degradation 
Breakdown Products via
Biotic and Abiotic Reductive Dechloritation
Using Various Application Methods

Kyle Clarke, Redox Tech, LLC

2:30 PM
Session Break / Exhibit Hall

3:00 PM

Environmental Law Update
Melissa Hamer-Bailey,
Norris Choplin Schroeder LLP

Matching Remediation Efficiency to
Site Goals for In Situ Bioremediation

Doug Davis, Regenesis

3:30 PM Non-target Chemicals as Source
Area Tracers, Two Case Studies
Using Freon 113 to Assist
PCE/TCE/TCA Plume Delineation

Rich Christensen, PhD, AcuityES
4:00 PM

Application of Improved Understanding Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Towards
Conceptual Site Models, Remedy
Selection and Remedy Performance

Andrew Kirkman, BP & Joel Thompson

Techniques for Maximizing the
Benefits of High Resolution Data Sets

Roger Lamb, Roger Lamb Consulting

4:30 PM
5:00 PM MSECA Conference Reception
5:30 PM
6:00 PM
6:30 PM
Adjourn

 

Start Time


Friday, December 13th

7:00 AM Registration / Breakfast
7:30 AM
8:00 AM

Large Site Rapid Investigation and
Multi-Disciplined Implementation
in Central Indiana - ERH
Remediation of VOCs in Soil,
Groundwater, LNAPL and DNAPL

Christopher Thomas, TRS Group, Inc &
Thomas M. Kinney, C.P.G., GHD Services, Inc.

Influence of Sulfate Reduction and
Biogenic Reactive Minerals on
Long-Term PRB Performance in
a Sulfate Rich, High Flow Aquifer

John Valkenburg, PeroxyChem

8:30 AM

Use of a Horizontal Colloidal
Activated Carbon Permeable Reactive
Barrier to Control Vertical Mass
Loading into a Sandstone Aquifer

Keith Gaskill, Regenesis

Integrated Biogeochemical/Electrochemical
Method for Remediation of Groundwater: ISCO
Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) Technology

Jim Mueller, Provectus Environmental Products, Inc.

9:00 AM

When is a Dollar Not A Dollar:
Evaluating Future Costs
James Berndt, August Mack Environmental

9:30 AM


Session Break / Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM

Phantom Menace of LNAPL in Bedrock
Andrew Kirkman, BP & Brad Koons, AECOM

Lessons Learned from Design Verification
Assessments at In Situ Remediation Sites
Brett Hicks, Regenesis

10:30 AM
11:00 AM

Mobile Data Collection and Automated Data
Visualizations, Evaluation and Reporting
Russell Schindler, SampleServe, Inc.

Latest Developments in TCE
Short-Term Indoor Air Standards
Laura Trozzolo, TRC Companies, Inc.

11:30 AM Keynote Presentation & Lunch
Communicating Air Pollution Risk in an Era of Emerging Pollutants
John Mooney, EPA Region 5
Acting Director of the Air and Radiation Division
12:00 PM
12:30 PM
1:00 PM
Adjourn


Presentation Descriptions:


Application of Improved Understanding Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Towards Conceptual Site Models, Remedy Selection and Remedy Performance

Andrew Kirkman, BP & Joel Thompson
See Presentation Description

Biodegradation of the hydrocarbon source zone has been termed Natural Source Zone Depletion (NSZD). It affects the stability of the LNAPL, supports better understanding what is achievable with various technologies, and supports identifying when a system has become ineffective. BP has moved towards leveraging the understanding of these biological degradation mechanisms to identify:

  1. The larger carbon foot prints and lower efficacy of vacuum truck recovery compared to enhancing aerobic degradation.
  2. Calculating and Bounding the distance that mobile LNAPL can migrate
  3. Improved selection of technologies
  4. Confirmation of previously identified remedial goals

The concept of the Conceptual Site model is not new however; what does it mean to sites that have not achieved remedial objectives. How can the ever evolving CSM be leveraged in progressing these more complex retail and larger sites. The improved understanding of biodegradation has provided additional assurance of stability and approaches to further a site towards the remedial goals along with updated guidance such as ITRC LNAPL-3.

Hide this content


Biochar as a low-cost alternative for remediation of metals and organic compounds

Bernd W. Rehm, ReSolution Partners
See Presentation Description

Stabilization of soil and waste to sequester metals and organic compounds is a function of site chemistry, remediation objectives and approaches, and reagent chemistry and cost. The toolbox of remediation reagents is expanding with the potential application of biochar. Laboratory bench-scale trials using metal and organic contaminants will demonstrate the performance of a commercially available biochar.

Hide this content


Chlorinated Solvent Forensics: Applying Multiple Lines of Evidence

Joshua Richards, Pace Analytical
See Presentation Description

Utilizing environmental forensics can be beneficial when standard remedial practice and analytical data indicate complex situations are occurring. These complexities could be multiple sources under the same remedial umbrella, offsite contributions, comingled plumes, as well as, stalled remediation programs. When implementing chlorinated solvent forensics, mainly via Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA), complex sites can be progressed. The use of multiple assessment tools, in addition to CSIA, is beneficial to complete Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) and close any data gaps that limit remedial progress. A two dimensional look utilizing CSIA can substantiate ongoing remedial activities and give light to fine tuning remedial action plans. This presentation evaluates a complex site for source determination and timing of release utilizing advanced site characterization tooling with the finial argument solidified by CSIA indicating multiple off-site sources present.

Hide this content


Combined Remedy Implementation: Alkaline Activated Persulfate with In Situ Solidification/Stabilization (ISCO-ISS) in a Single Application

John Valkenburg, PeroxyChem & Bill Lang, Lang Tool Co.
See Presentation Description

In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and in situ solidification/stabilization (ISS) are two well established remedial technologies that can be co-applied in a single application. Each uses different mechanisms to reduce contaminant risks and hazards; ISCO degrades and reduces contaminant mass while ISS solidifies, stabilizes and reduces contaminant mass flux. Amendment dosages can be varied to meet site-specific post-application contaminant concentration and leachability, hydraulic conductivity and compressive soil strength requirements.

Alkaline activated persulfate ISCO uses alkaline reagents typically used for ISS. Combining technologies using soil mixing enables contaminant mass reductions via ISCO with stabilized soil and reduced mass flux via ISS, enabling site redevelopment. This presentation provides an overview of bench and field-scale results from several sites:

  • Key parameter evaluation data - contaminant concentration, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), hydraulic conductivity and unconfined compression strength (UCS).
  • Combining ISCO-ISS reagents for better control over post application soil UCS characteristics.
  • Combining ISCO with ISS to reduce:
    • Total reagent costs by using ISS reagent alkalinity to activate Klozur persulfate
    • Total reagent mass and ultimate soil volume and
    • Leachate concentration results compared to ISS only
    • Hydraulic conductivity vs ISS alone (case-specific)
  • Overview of several recent case studies

Hide this content


Cost-effective Source Area Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium

David Beck, Tetra Tech
See Presentation Description

Historic chrome plating operations in the 1960s to 1980 at a small tool and die shop in Muncie, Indiana resulted in localized, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium in building materials, soil and groundwater. Building and soil impacts were addressed using removal and off-site disposal. Groundwater impacts in the source area were addressed using a Ferrous Sulfate Monohydrate product and at the margins of the Site using zero valent iron (ZVI). Both products were applied using direct-push injection methods. Hexavalent chromium concentrations in source area groundwater decreased from greater than 60,000 ug/L before remediation to <1.5 μg/L in the source area and <0.30 ug/L in the margins of the treatment area 9 months following application. This presentation will summarize the overall remediation approach to address the source area, discuss the chemistry of groundwater treatment of hexavalent chromium at the Site and products available (in general), present and discuss groundwater concentrations of hexavalent chromium and secondary contaminants (iron, manganese and arsenic).

Hide this content


Emulsified Vegetable Oil Delivery and Challenges in Fractured Karstic Bedrock

Raymond Vaské, AECOM
See Presentation Description

This presentation describes a series of four remediation events in which emulsified vegetable oil and supplementary amendments were delivered via gravity and high-pressure injection methods into fractured karstic bedrock to accomplish the enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) of dissolved and dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethylene (PCE) impacts to groundwater, bedrock and overlying soil at a former manufacturing facility in central Kentucky. As amendments were depleted, adaptive injection events were conducted triennially to improve the distribution of amendments and PCE. Highlights of this presentation include observations and lessons regarding amendment dosage, natural buffering capacity, chemical buffering via sodium bicarbonate and zero valent iron, bioaugmentation methods and significantly enhancing the microbial community, secondary porosity transport of emulsified vegetable oil to a spring, production of daughter compounds, methane production, and challenges in collecting representative groundwater samples within an area of active ERD. The ongoing work is considered highly successful, with ethene at higher levels than parent and daughter chlorinated volatile organic compounds.

Hide this content


Environmental Law Update

Melissa Hamer-Bailey, Norris Choplin Schroeder LLP
See Presentation Description

What's changing for us here in Indiana and across the country, from WOTUS to developments involving limitations on the Indiana Environmental Legal Action statutes.

Hide this content


Incoming! Utilizing In-Situ Bioremediation in a Commingled Plume with an Uncontrolled Source

Rob Ferree, CPG & Ryan Fimmen, PhD, Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.
See Presentation Description

cVOCs have been detected in groundwater on- and off-Site. Multiple releases of PCE and TCE have occurred on-Site and on upgradient properties resulting in a co-mingled plume In-situ bioremediation (ISBR) bench and pilot studies were completed to evaluate the suitability and effectiveness of ISBR in achieving cleanup goals and to determine design parameters. Full-scale implementation requires a design to account for uncontrolled upgradient sources and migration of cVOC-impacted groundwater onto the Site.

Bench-scale testing was performed to assess the suitability of ISBR for the Site. Experiments were run on microcosms constructed using site soil and groundwater from the upper and lower aquifers. One set of microcosms was amended with emulsified vegetable oil (EDS-ERTM EVO), and another set of microcosms was amended with both EDS-ERTM EVO and the KB-1® culture.

Pilot-scale injections consisted of a solution of EDS-ERTM EVO and water, anaerobic water prepared with KB-1 Primer®, and the KB-1® bioaugmentation culture within the sand-and-gravel aquifer at five locations. Following injections, select monitoring wells were sampled with additional monitoring through June 2019. Samples were analyzed for cVOCs, geochemical parameters, and dissolved gases, to evaluate for evidence of reductive dechlorination (RD).

RD was observed during the pilot study at the four nearest downgradient monitoring wells based on a decrease of cVOC concentrations, geochemical parameters indicative of reducing conditions, increased production of dissolved gases, and Gene-Trac® analyses. However, RD appears to be occurring slowly and/or concentrations have rebounded, as cVOCs migrating from upgradient sources consume the EDS-ERTM EVO.

Hide this content


Influence of Sulfate Reduction and Biogenic Reactive Minerals on Long-Term PRB Performance in a Sulfate Rich, High Flow Aquifer

John Valkenburg, PeroxyChem
See Presentation Description

Carbon Tetrachloride (CT) impacted groundwater at high site groundwater flow velocity resulted in a CT plume migrating 2,500 feet and discharging into a creek. A Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) was installed to passively treat CT by injecting EHC® ISCR Reagent slurry. Inflowing sulfate-rich groundwater (~120 mg/L) impacts substrate consumption rates and shortens treatment zone life. This presentation reviews geochemical parameter response and CT removal rates over time and compares them with theoretical calculations using site specific data. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) is monitored as a reagent indicator while ORP, Dissolved Oxygen (DO), nitrate and sulfate are monitored to assess redox conditions. Calculations are discussed relative to the actual > 10 year PRB longevity and apparent mechanisms for the extended life.

CT removal rates peaked 16 months after installation at >99 percent removal. Two years after installation, removal rates decreased to ~95 percent and have stabilized for >10 years. Theoretical ZVI consumption calculations suggest ZVI consumption after 2.7 years from inflowing sulfate. However, geochemical data suggest that ZVI by itself is not supporting significant sulfate reduction. The probable explanation for the long PRB life is the formation of reduced iron sulfide minerals, which act as a zone of abiotic reductive treatment.

Hide this content


Integrated Biogeochemical/Electrochemical Method for Remediation of Groundwater: ISCO Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) Technology

Jim Mueller, Provectus Environmental Products, Inc.
See Presentation Description

New technologies are desired for safe, cost-effective remediation of groundwater impacted by a wide variety of organic contaminants, including (rapidly) emerging contaminants. Ideally, the in situ technology can be effectively employed in deep aquifers and mixed lithologies to easily manage large, dilute plumes often in remote areas. Other benefits would include low cost, small footprint, minimal energy consumption (solar/wind), low maintenance and no external chemical requirements. The EBR® technology system generates O2 and H2O2 in the presence of Fe cations to form low Fermi level Fe3+ nanoparticles which are propagated throughout the aquifer to continuously yield reactive oxidant species (ROS) including powerful hydroxyl radials and ferrate. Furthermore, electro-osmosis induces groundwater flow between coupled wellbores yielding a more complete approach to aquifer remediation, especially in fine-grained, low-permeability materials that typically harbor sorbed residuals. In terms of secondary processes to help manage contaminant rebound, the co-mobilization of nutrients and the oxidative nature of the method supports accelerated aerobic bioremediation. Rapid oxidation of chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons has been observed at pilot and full scales, and future applications could address perchlorate, some perflourinated compounds, 1,4-dioxane, pharmaceuticals and other challenging contaminants.

Hide this content


Large Site Rapid Investigation and Multi-Disciplined Implementation in Central Indiana - ERH Remediation of VOCs in Soil, Groundwater, LNAPL and DNAPL

Christopher Thomas, TRS Group, Inc & Thomas M. Kinney, C.P.G., GHD Services, Inc.
See Presentation Description

Background/Objectives. The site is a former manufacturing facility located in central Indiana and encompasses approximately 148 acres; the primary building was 2 million square feet. The manufacturing operations spanned approximately 55 years between 1957 and 2012. The manufacturing facility was demolished in 2017.

Remedial investigations (RIs) were completed using traditional soil and groundwater sampling along with extensive membrane interface probe (MIP) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) and dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) were identified in addition to chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) and 1,4-dioxane in NAPL, soil, groundwater, and soil gas. A remediation work plan was prepared using data from the RI and results of a risk assessment. The objectives of the work plan were to remove NAPL, reduce source area concentrations, prevent human exposure, and prevent off-site migration of the contaminants.

The objectives are being met by excavating shallow impacted soils and completing dewatering activities near the property boundary and by implementing a robust electrical resistivity heating (ERH) program in the larger heavily impacted areas of the site.

Approach/Activities. An ERH system was designed for the simultaneous treatment of five separate source areas located across the property totaling approximately 156,000 square feet and extending to a depth of approximately 25 feet below ground surface. There was an estimated 28,000 pounds of cVOCs within the target zones to be thermally removed through direct volatilization, steam stripping and hydrolysis. A secondary goal was to remediate the LNAPL and petroleum hydrocarbon impacts within the vadose zone above the target zones. The ERH system includes 574 electrodes, 80 multi-phase extraction (MPE) wells, 50 temperature monitoring points, and 50 vapor monitoring points. The recovered steam and soil vapors are transported to condensers where the mixture is passed through a vapor/liquid separator and heat exchanger. Entrained fluids and condensed steam are recovered and conveyed to an oil-water separator. The extracted air is either treated via a regenerative thermal oxidizer or vapor phase granular activated carbon.

Results/Lessons Learned. Excavation and dewatering activities were completed in six relatively small source areas along the property boundary. Over 4,400 tons of non-hazardous soil and 426 tons of hazardous soil were excavated and removed off-site, along with over 17,000 gallons of nonhazardous water. Verification samples collected from the floors and walls of the excavations documented the excavations had accomplished project remediation goals.

ERH system startup was June 26, 2019. It is anticipated that ERH remediation will be completed by December 2019. Project remediation goals are to reduce cVOCs by a minimum of 99 percent. As of August 19, 2019, following almost seven weeks of operations, approximately 3,600 pounds of VOCs have been removed by the vapor phase and approximately 43,000 pounds of LNAPL have been recovered.

Hide this content


Latest Developments in TCE Short-Term Indoor Air Standards

Laura Trozzolo, TRC Companies, Inc.
See Presentation Description

Given the uncertainty around trichloroethylene's (TCE's) inhalation reference concentration (RfC), how do we evaluate and manage potential risk from inhalation exposure? Many states and several USEPA Regions have published their health-protective air standards; however, there is significant variability across these air standards. Therefore, how do we know which standards are health protective for our sites? This presentation will walk through the equations used to calculate health-protective air standards for TCE and explain the variability across different environmental regulatory agencies.

Hide this content


Lessons Learned from Design Verification Assessments at In Situ Remediation Sites

Brett Hicks, Regenesis
See Presentation Description

This presentation will focus on Design Verification steps that directly improve existing design assumptions prior to field applications. The goal of this program is to determine what "lower-cost" field-based methods might provide significant benefits (insight) into design and application methods to optimize in-situ applications; thus, resulting in improved remedial performance outcomes. Over the past 20 years, application of remedial substrates has had an uneven track record in terms of performance. Generally speaking, in-situ remedial performance is the result of multiple factors. This presentation will focus on the identification of aquifer characteristics that can be documented using traditional field methods and provide the most insight into the remedial design and application programs. Specifically, this presentation will focus on those Target Treatment Zone (TTZ) characteristics that directly affect application programs and ultimately remedial outcomes.To assist design and application teams, a set of routine "Design Verification" steps were developed and performed on select project sites (N +30). Using these steps to identify the relationship between COC mass storage and distribution units within TTZ has contributed to an overall improvement in application programs and is seen to be a key element in higher remedial success rates.

Hide this content


Matching Remediation Efficiency to Site Goals for In Situ Bioremediation

Doug Davis, Regenesis
See Presentation Description

How Long Will it Take? How Much Does it Cost? These are the two most common questions asked by project stakeholders pursuing implementation of remediation at a project site. The answers are not mutually exclusive however. As in business, the time-equals-money maxim also applies to remediation. For well over a decade, we have assessed the effects of numerous in situ bioremediation (ISB) treatments to promote the destruction of the four most common chlorinated ethenes: perchlorethene (PCE), trichlorethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Typically, these treatments have included the injection of a controlled-release electron donor mixture either through injection wells or direct push rig tooling followed by subsequent monitoring of performance. In recent years, a number of technologies have been brought to market which when added to the electron donor, can optimize efficiency of the treatment and in some cases, drastically reduce the time required to eliminate risk and/or meet the project goals. These include bioaugmentation agents, iron agents (zero valent and divalent) and colloidal activated carbon. This presentation will be a data-driven, multi-site review utilizing various technologies currently available for ISB treatment of chlorinated ethenes and what their combined usage equates to in terms of ability to meet closure objectives, the time required to meet them and relative costs form implementing these approaches.

Hide this content


Mobile Data Collection and Automated Data Visualizations, Evaluation and Reporting

Russell Schindler, SampleServe, Inc.
See Presentation Description

Mr. Schindler will be speaking about how mobile field data collection applications will be changing the way we collect data, submit samples to the lab and report results to clients and regulators. Mobile apps are changing the way businesses make decisions and communicate information with each other. These applications are fundamentally changing the business to business models used in the environmental industry today. Modern algorithms and analytics are being used to automatically and instantly generate data visualizations seconds after laboratory analysis is complete, by-passing the traditional methods and costs for generating these data visualization reports.

Hide this content


Non-target Chemicals as Source Area Tracers, Two Case Studies Using Freon 113 to Assist PCE/TCE/TCA Plume Delineation

Richard H. Christensen, Jr. PhD, LPG, Acuity Environmental Solutions, LLC
See Presentation Description

Background/Objectives

Case Study #1 - Confidential Commercial/Industrial Building (Site) located in the Pacific Southwest. The Client's Site is located downgradient of a historical tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) release. The original upgradient release had been remediated and received an agency approved closure. Currently the Client's Site is under contract for the sale of the property. During the Phase I and Phase II assessments, the purchaser's consultant concluded that soil vapor beneath the slab, and detectable concentrations of chlorinated solvents in the soil, were indicative of a NEW release of chlorinated solvents in groundwater (depth greater than 100 feet below ground surface). The objective was to find conclusive evidence that the Client's Site is not a source of PCE or TCE.

Case Study #2 - Confidential Commercial/Industrial Building (Site) located in the Southwest. The Site has been in the RCRA program for more than three decades and is active remediation by way of a groundwater extraction and treatment system. The State agency requested a vertical soil vapor assessment to evaluate possible exposure pathways into the on-Site building. The objective was to delineate sources of TCE and trichloroethane (TCA) in the soil vapor, evaluate human exposure risk, and develop a remedy.

Approach/Activities

Case Study #1 - One of the challenges for investigating this building was the fact the buildings in the area were constructed with no space between structures making it difficult to access the groundwater table (~100 feet). After completing an in-depth evaluation of the upgradient source, it was discovered that there were two releases to the environment originating from the upgradient source. The first was PCE/TCE, but the second was Freon-113. The iso-concentration contours for Freon-113 were in alignment with the concentration contours for TCE.

Case Study #2 - In preparation for completing the vertical soil gas assessment (at the request of the agency), the investigation team completed a shallow soil gas survey to profile the investigation area. The agency requested the Client complete a groundwater flow model, as there was concern the impacted groundwater could impact a municipal supply well. At the same time, the investigation team completed an extensive review of soil and groundwater data over the past thirty years. The investigation team identified an upgradient Freon-113 source in groundwater. This allowed the team to overlap the TCE and TCA data from the shallow soil gas survey and discover a new distinct plume.

Results/Lessons Learned

Case Study #1 - With the Freon-113 data, the investigation team provided multiple lines of evidence to the Agency to demonstrate that additional delineation efforts would not locate a release from the Client's building, and that sub-slab depressurization would be of sufficient vapor control to reduce exposure to current and future building occupants. These conclusions will be used to complete the building sale.

Case Study #2 - The Freon-113 iso-concentration contours were in alignment with the concentration contours for the TCE. The TCA data was unique and distinct, and the team was able to identify the TCA point of release on the Client's Site, further, the team identified the TCE and Freon-113 are from an upgradient source.

Hide this content


Phantom Menace of LNAPL in Bedrock

Andrew Kirkman, BP & Brad Koons, AECOM
See Presentation Description

LNAPL appears in the well, LNAPL detected in multiple fractures in bedrock, however is it really in all of those fractures. A discussion of LNAPL in bedrock will be provided to help prioritize the fractures which LNAPL is estimated to exist in over a larger extent than the scale of 2- 4 well diameters. Recently increased frequency of baildown testing of LNAPL in bedrock wells has identified behavior inconsistent with unconsolidated materials. Utilizing the same pressure head relationships from undergraduate text books combined with bedrock fracture network results in improved conceptualization of the issues.

Hide this content


Quality of life performances considerations while conducting construction and remediation projects

Will Elcoate, Alpha Analytical
See Presentation Description

Many brownfield re-development, remediation and construction projects occur in neighborhoods which may have a nuisance and health risk exposure. Each site may have specific compounds of concern where the goal is to reduce these to below levels that are considered an exposure risk. The matrices may include soils , Haz waste, groundwater, sediment surface water, and liquids. Remedial activities, include excavation, material removal, transportation or onsite treatment generating nuisance dust, release of volatile compounds, aerosols, Vapors, odor and particulates containing metals and toxic organic compounds. These may include PAHs, PCBs and other contaminants of concern. Are PFCs being added to this list? Although not addressed directly by the CAA off site emissions are often less than CAA trigger levels of pollutants. A number of States have publish some information on controlling these emissions. The NJDEP are working on a perimeter Monitoring guidance that promises to provide a comprehensive approach to managing these emissions. The presentation will give an overview of the challenges: Discuss using multiple inputs both physical and analytical with real-time monitoring and verification to manage and reduce the impact of offsite contaminant migration.

Hide this content


Rapid Soil Vapor Plume Delineation for Vapor Intrusion Investigations

Jennifer Simms, Jacobs
See Presentation Description

Delineation of large-scale soil vapor plumes is technically and logistically challenging, and standard investigation methods are costly and time consuming. An investigation technique to rapidly and efficiently delineate soil vapor plumes has been developed and field tested. Temporary soil vapor probes are installed and sampled, then near real-time analysis is performed with a HAPSITE (portable gas chromatography - mass spectrometry unit). Soil vapor sampling is initiated near the source area, stepping out until the boundary of the plume is defined. Multi-depth soil vapor sampling can also be performed for vertical profiling. This investigation technique has been successfully utilized at three EPA-led National Priority List (NPL) sites. Experience from these sites showed that this investigation technique provided efficient and economical delineation consistent with Triad principles of field adaptive decision making (ITRC, 2003). Comparison to laboratory-analyzed duplicate samples (frequency of 10 percent) confirmed the accuracy of the HAPSITE results. The near real-time results allowed for step-out sampling to be performed during the same mobilization, and unnecessary sampling was avoided. Disturbance to landowners was minimized, and the effort to obtain property access agreements was avoided because temporary soil vapor probes were installed in city right-of-ways. The number of buildings requiring interior vapor intrusion investigations was minimized by first delineating the soil vapor plume. An overview of the methods and results from the three EPA-led NPL sites will be presented, along with the conclusions and lessons-learned.

Hide this content


Remediation of 1,1,2 - TCA and Degradation Breakdown Products via Biotic and Abiotic Reductive Dechloritation Using Various Application Methods

Kyle Clarke, Redox Tech, LLC
See Presentation Description

A full-scale application of ABC+, a mixture of Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) and carbon substrate (ABC®) was performed by Redox Tech to remediate soil and groundwater at a facility in southern Kansas. The contaminant of concern was 1,1,2 - Trichloroethane (TCA) and its' degradation breakdown products 1,1 - Dichloroethene (DCE) and Vinyl Chloride (VC). Low permeable sediment and a sloping bedrock interface presented unique challenges at this site. Soil blending was selected as the application method in the source zone which allowed large quantities of ZVI to be introduced for chemical reduction. One of the many advantages of using soil blending as the application method is its ability to distribute amendment evenly throughout the impacted area. The blending in the source zone was combined with injections via direct push (DPT) drilling techniques at the downgradient portion of the plume. The combination of application methods and amendments utilized at this site proved effective at promoting enhanced reductive dechlorination and subsequent reduction of contaminant concentrations.

Hide this content


Risk Assessment Challenges Associated with Atmospheric Transport of PFAS

Laura Trozzolo, TRC Companies, Inc.
See Presentation Description

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) exposure associated with atmospheric transport is difficult to quantify from a risk perspective. However, EPA's traditional risk assessment process can still be utilized to understand PFAS exposure related to ambient air exposure, as well as deposition of airborne PFAS within the airshed of the emission source. Therefore, the focus of this presentation will be on three primary components, (1) fate and transport of PFAS; and (2) health effects of PFAS, and (3) investigation tools to understand the nature and extent of PFAS related to emission sources.

Hide this content


Simply cook it: Above-ground removal of PFAS from solids at 350 - 400°C

Lauren Soos, TRS Group, Inc
See Presentation Description

Background/Objectives. Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) releases have occurred at more than 600 Department of Defense sites. Excavation followed by off-site disposal or treatment is currently the only well-developed option to address PFAS contamination. As a result, there are currently a multitude of sites with PFAS-impacted stockpiles awaiting off-site disposal or treatment.

On-site PFAS treatment offers significant cost benefits; however, available treatment options to date have been limited. An alternate approach involving PFAS dissociation, desorption, volatilization and capture has been shown to be a highly effective treatment option.

By simply heating excavated soil on site, the costs and challenges associated with off-site soil transportation are significantly reduced. This presentation describes the thermal treatment system design requirements for on-site PFAS treatment.

Approach/Activities. PFAS ex situ thermal treatment design approaches will be described including necessary heating components, required temperature ranges, and process stream treatment options. The critical role of the scrubber used to cool the extracted fluids, which substantially reduces the volume of PFAS impacted process water, will also be presented.

Results/Lessons Learned. Above-ground thermal treatment system options have been developed for a broad range of soil batch sizes with a focus on minimizing the production of PFAS impacted waste by using a scrubber. Target treatment temperatures have been developed for PFAS showing 350 to 400°C results in a greater than 99% PFAS reduction, with minimal PFAS removal at 220°C. An interesting finding is that thermal treatment also reduces the natural organic carbon content of the soil or sediment, such that sorption forces are strongly reduced.

The heating equipment needed is similar to equipment used to treat dioxins, PCBs, and other heavy hydrocarbons, and target temperatures are in the same range. The process is well documented at the field scale.

The significant cost savings and waste reduction provided by on-site thermal treatment systems will be presented. The presentation will focus on the optimal design approaches for the most cost effective PFAS thermal treatment options.

Hide this content


Techniques for Maximizing the Benefits of High Resolution Data Sets

Roger Lamb, Roger Lamb Consulting
See Presentation Description

This presentation will provide details on how three different high resolution data sets were used to maximize remediation outcomes. Case Study 1 - Development of high resolution mass flux calculations to aid in gasoline plume remediation design , Case Study 2 - Development of high resolution TCE NAPL body mass and volume estimates to aid in remediation feasibility, Case Study 3 - Development of high resolution volume estimates of buried acidic waste to aid excavation costing and design.

Hide this content


Use of a Horizontal Colloidal Activated Carbon Permeable Reactive Barrier to Control Vertical Mass Loading into a Sandstone Aquifer

Keith Gaskill, Regenesis
See Presentation Description

Background/Objectives. The objective of this remedial action was to reduce vertical mass loading into a sandstone aquifer. A historical release of chlorinated solvents had been observed originating from a former drycleaner situated in an active strip mall. The geology at the point of release is complex. Though the ground surface is flat, a glaciogenic, unconsolidated sand, with areas of higher silt and clay content, overlies a fractured dolomite unit. Much of the fracture matrix within the dolomite is filled with clay and silt making direct treatment of the dolomite unpredictable and impractical. In the area of the release, the glacial unit is approximately 10 feet thick (0'-10' bgs) while the dolomite is approximately 40 feet thick. To the southwest, where the dolomite pinches out in a northwest to southeast trend line, the unconsolidated sediment thickness is approximately 50 feet. At approximately 50 feet below grade, in locations near the release point, a homogeneous poorly cemented sandstone unit is encountered. The groundwater flows southwest in the dolomite and southeast in the sandstone. The solvent release traveled vertically through the unsaturated overburden into the dolomite, and then migrated both laterally and vertically with groundwater flow through the fractured dolomite and into the sandstone. This phenomenon created a roughly 30,000 square foot area of mass loading to the sandstone where the plume propagates to a length of approximately one mile downgradient.

Approach/Activities. In order to obtain an understanding of the groundwater/dissolved mass fate and transport in this complicated system, aquifer testing, RemChlor and MODFLOW computer modeling, tracer testing, core sampling, downhole geophysics, surficial geophysics, open-hole packer groundwater profiling, and traditional sampling methods were completed. In March 2018, a colloidal activated carbon substrate was applied to the uppermost 10 feet of the sandstone unit in the areal extent where mass flux from the overlying dolomite was determined to be the highest. This application orientation, a horizontal permeable reactive barrier, was installed utilizing 21 drilled two-inch PVC injection wells in a gridded pattern. The barrier design was modeled based on estimated vertical contaminant flux. Careful consideration of the volume of fluid and concentration of carbon was completed in order to accomplish both a strong delivery into the formation and to maintain effectiveness of the barrier long-term. A total injection volume of approximately 96,000 gallons was applied to the barrier.

Results/Lessons Learned. Designing a horizontal barrier to prevent vertical migration ofcontaminants requires a shift in mindset to think vertically instead of horizontally. This results in unique design considerations and challenges when estimating contaminant flux in the vertical plane (i.e. leakage) to determine reagent dosing. A sufficient hydrogeologic understanding to guide injection point placement and ensure overlap of injectate is also critical for this approach to work. A large injection volume was required resulting in pressure build-ups over the course of the project. In response a multi-point, frequent-switching application strategy was used to overcome this challenge along with frequent surging of the wells. This presentation will include over 6 quarters of contaminant and geochemical sampling post-application. Current results indicate greater than 74% PCE mass flux reduction into the sand unit with results as high as 89% at some locations with minimal daughter product formation.

Hide this content


Use of a New Liquid Activated Carbon Amendment to Cost-Effectively Address High Dissolved-Phase Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Groundwater

Steve Sittler, Patriot Engineering
See Presentation Description

This presentation will provide details of the successful application of a new liquid activated carbon amendment to sorb petroleum volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater and enhance anaerobic biodegradation. At a former petroleum bulk storage facility in South Bend, Indiana, the new product, PetroFix™, which is manufactured by Regenesis Bioremediation Products (Regenesis) was initially beta tested via a pilot study in a highly-impacted area of the site (monitored by well PMW-36), where total petroleum VOCs exceeded 40,000 micrograms per liter (ug/L).The pilot study injection was completed in May 2018 and post-injection groundwater sampling events following completion of the injection indicated that one month after injection, there were no detectable VOCs in the groundwater in PMW-36. The total petroleum hydrocarbons-gasoline range organics (TPH-GRO) concentration was also below detectable limits (from a pre-injection level of 33.8 milligrams per liter (mg/L)) while the TPH-DRO concentration decreased from 17.9 mg/L to 3.6 mg/L. Nitrate and sulfate spiked one month after injection (due to their addition as electron acceptors as part of the injection) but were reduced sharply at the three-month sampling event and beyond, indicating utilization by microbes in biodegradation. This conclusion was also strongly supported by microbial analyses, which indicated a shift towards anaerobic petroleum degraders, caused by the more favorable environment induced by the electron acceptor salts (nitrate and sulfate) injected with the PetroFix™. Finally, naturally-occurring methane production was not suppressed post-injection, suggesting the microbial community was primed for methanogenic degradation of contaminants bound to the activated carbon.Based on the results of the pilot study, a full-scale PetroFix™ injection was proposed in a Remediation Work Plan (RWP), which was rapidly approved by the IDEM. The injection designs were easily developed in-house using user-friendly Regenesis software. The full-scale application was completed in April 2019 and included injection of a total of 16,400 pounds of PetroFix™ and 820 pounds of the electron acceptor blend into 120 injection points in six separate areas of the site. In addition to immediately sorbing petroleum VOCs from the groundwater and enhancing anaerobic biodegradation in the injection areas, the injection grids were arranged to create a series of “barriers” that will continue to treat impacted groundwater between and downgradient from the injection locations on a long-term basis.Post-injection monitoring results will be presented showing the success of the full-scale application in rapid reduction of petroleum VOCs in groundwater, and the subsequent ongoing biodegradation of residual impacts. In addition, a brief cost evaluation will also be presented showing the significant cost savings and benefits of this new product compared to more conventional alternatives.

Hide this content


When is a Dollar Not A Dollar: Evaluating Future Costs

James Berndt, August Mack Environmental
See Presentation Description

Evaluating remedial options for a site often comes down to, at least in part, to a comparison of costs. However, for projects which will extend many years into the future, a comparison of costs in present day dollars does not reflect the actual environmental cost liability. To be able to accurately compare the future costs of various remedial options it is necessary to take into account the appreciation of dollars invested today, to be used at some future date. It is also necessary to take into account the estimated depreciation of today's dollar by future inflation. This type of financial evaluation is call a "Net Present Value" adjustment and allows the accurate evaluation of the value of future environmental liabilities. We will discuss a simple method for adjusting remedial cost estimates to Net Present Value and look at spreadsheet functions which can automate this process.

Hide this content


Presenter Biographies:


David Beck, Tetra Tech

See Presenter Bio

David Beck has a Bachelor of Science in Geology from Michigan State University and a Master of Science degree in Geology from Western Michigan University. David has been in consulting for 16 years and has served at the technical lead and project manager for EPA lead Superfund and RCRA sites and various State lead Cleanup, Voluntary Remediation and RCRA sites for a variety of contaminant including chlorinated solvents, PCBs, metals and petroleum. David has consulted on numerous remediation sites across the US, assisting in developing remedial strategies and evaluating remedial technologies. David was a Principal Co-Author of the USEPA document, "Introduction to In Situ Bioremediation of Groundwater."

Hide this content


James Berndt, August Mack Environmental

See Presenter Bio

James Berndt, LPG, is a Principal Hydrogeologist and Manager of Technical Services in the Corporate office of August Mack Environmental, Inc. with 29 years of experience in the environmental industry. During his career Mr. Berndt has managed hundreds of environmental projects for clients across the United States, in Europe and South America; he has taught hydrogeology as a member of the adjunct faculty of the University of Indianapolis. His primary areas of expertise include site investigation, remediation, groundwater modeling and site management.

Hide this content


Richard H. Christensen, Jr. PhD, LPG, Acuity Environmental Solutions, LLC

See Presenter Bio

Dr. Richard Christensen is a Principal Hydrogeologist at Acuity Environmental Solutions (Acuity) located in Fishers, IN. He obtained his BS in Geology from Grand Valley State College in 1984, his MS in Hydrogeology from Western Michigan University in 1987, and his PhD in Science Technology and Society (STS) from the Union Institute and University in 2004. At Acuity Dr. Christensen has specialized in the investigation and remediation of recalcitrant contaminants such as chlorinated solvents and heavy metals.

Hide this content


Kyle Clarke, Redox Tech, LLC

See Presenter Bio

Kyle Clarke has a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Kansas and over seven years of experience in the environmental remediation field. Mr. Clarke is currently the Office Manager/Engineer for Redox Tech's Downers Grove, IL location. He has experience with various remedial techniques including in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD), bioaugmentation, and steaming for product recovery. Delivery techniques have ranged from DPT injection to in-situ soil blending.

Mr. Clarke has extensive experience supervising large scale projects, where he has been responsible for the organization and direction of multiple field crews operating simultaneously. He is involved with the planning, implementation and reporting of the projects he supervises.

Hide this content


Doug Davis, Regenesis

See Presenter Bio

Doug Davis has over 25 years of experience in contaminated site investigation and remediation, including the last 13 years at REGENESIS where he serves as Senior Design Specialist for the East/Central Region.

Hide this content


Will Elcoate, Alpha Analytical

See Presenter Bio

Will Elcoate is a National Air Product Manager for the Air Program for Alpha Analytical Laboratories. Since 1987, he has worked in the environmental laboratory testing industry. He is the lead for Alpha's Air Program. Will's current responsibilities include the technical and regulatory support for Alpha's Air program. In that capacity, he stays in touch with State & Federal regulations, rules and guidance for air programs and works with Alpha's Air Laboratory operations to develop capabilities and services to support emerging needs. He provides technical training and market support for the Alpha’s Air clients and has spoken at conferences across the USA. He started in the environmental testing industry working as a Chemist in the copper mines in Zambia. Upon arriving on the US East Coast he worked for 10 years in the Industrial water treatment industry as a product development & technology scientist. On joining an environmental testing laboratory industry he has held a number of operational, technical and client service positions. Will earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Bath University, Bath, Avon, UK in 1974.

Hide this content


Rob Ferree, CPG, Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Ferree has more than 30 years of professional experience in environmental consulting. His expertise includes hydrogeologic investigations; remedial investigations; soil and groundwater sampling plan preparation; soil and groundwater sampling in accordance with RCRA and CERCLA guidance; surface and down-hole geophysical methods; remediation system design; remedial system installation; slug test and aquifer test performance and analysis; and environmental site assessments (ESAs).

Hide this content


Ryan Fimmen, PhD, Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Ryan has more than 13 years of experience as an environmental geochemist, providing consulting services in the fields of remediation of soils, sediments, and groundwater; contaminant fate and transformation; research and development of environmental remedial technologies; litigation support and report preparation; and environmental technology evaluation, verification, and certification. His experience includes consulting to private sector and government clients for coordinating effective field-scale investigations, laboratory analyses, data reduction/interpretation, and the preparation of high-quality reports for submission to clients, state and federal regulators, and publication in peer-reviewed journals.

Hide this content


Keith Gaskill, Regenesis

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Gaskill has worked as a scientist for over 19 years in the environmental industry. He has performed project tasks such as site investigations for a variety of property management and property sales issues; UST/AST investigation and removal; petroleum pipeline and bulk storage response and remediation, site investigation/remediation at dry cleaner facilities across the United States; computer modeling of groundwater systems and geochemical fate and transport; hydrological and hydrogeological assessments, mechanical remediation system conceptual design and implementation; pilot testing and remediation feasibility studies; expert witness services; extensive site investigation and delineation studies using traditional and TRIAD methodology; various types of hydrogeologic testing such as slug testing and pump testing; operation and data management of Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) and mobile lab technologies; management of multiple sites for major oil companies, dry cleaners, and miscellaneous industry. Mr. Gaskill also focuses on high data density and high-resolution data analysis and conceptual site model production. As a Senior Design Specialist, Mr. Gaskill will be providing innovative solutions to aid in the remediation of a variety of sites in the Central and East Regions.

Hide this content


Melissa Hamer-Bailey, Norris Choplin Schroeder LLP

See Presenter Bio

Melissa A. Hamer-Bailey is an associate at Norris Choplin Schroeder LLP, a member of the firm's insurance, environmental, construction, and toxic tort practice groups, and is a registered mediator. She handles a variety of related matters, from environmental and regulatory issues to engineering malpractice defense, contracts, and insurance coverage. Melissa is a 2019 Indiana SuperLawyer Rising Star in Environmental Litigation. She has been a CHMM since 2010 and is an environmental professional under ASTM E 1527-13. Prior to joining NCS, Melissa was a law clerk in the Marion Environmental Court, the Indiana Office of Environmental Adjudication, and worked as an attorney on a variety of data and ESI cases. Prior to law school, Melissa was an environmental consultant, risk assessor, regulator, environmental laboratory manager in multiple states.

Melissa is a volunteer attorney through the Indianapolis Bar Association (IndyBar), the Indiana Bar Association, and the Indiana Bar Foundation. She has served on the Women and the Law Division Executive Committee for IndyBar since 2017, where she has chaired the Mentoring Program since 2018, and she serves on the Professionalism and Legislative Committees. Melissa is a member of the Environmental Section of the American Bar Association, the Association of Women in e-Discovery, IDO's Real Estate & Development Committee, the Association of Hazardous Materials Professionals, Lowell Little League Board of Directors, and the Economic Club of Indiana, among other organizations. Melissa is a regular speaker for the Midwestern State Environmental Consultants Association, which she helped found over a decade ago. She also enjoys gardening, raising backyard chickens, traveling, restoring vintage typewriters and old homes, and being a mom to two amazing sons.

Hide this content


Brett Hicks, Regenesis

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Hicks has over ten years of experience in the environmental field in the areas of site investigation, project management, risk assessment and technical assistance. He received his undergraduate degree in biology from Ball State University. Mr. Hicks currently serves as the Ohio Valley District Manager with Regenesis, where he provides technical support for the design and application of soil and groundwater remediation as well as vapor intrusion mitigation technology solutions. Mr. Hicks works directly with environmental consulting, construction, and engineering firms to develop successful remedial approaches by offering design, application, and performance review expertise for in-situ applied remedial strategies across a broad spectrum of technology classes.

Hide this content


Andrew Kirkman, BP

See Presenter Bio

Andrew has presented at conferences consistently over his 20 year career. Andrew was previously a trainer for ASTM International on the LNAPL Transmissivity Standard E2856-13, has been an ITRC LNAPL trainer for the past 6 years, as well as provided LNAPL related training for the States of Virginia, Colorado, Missouri and Minnesota. Most recently Andrew worked with the USEPA OUST and John Sohl of Columbia Technologies to deliver a workshop at the NEWIPCC 2018 Tanks conference on High Resolution Site Characterization. Andrew's career started doing field work including groundwater sampling, well installation, and hydrocarbon field investigations at railroad, pipeline, manufactured gas plant, and tie treatment plant sites. Continued development resulted in Andrew leading the ASTM LNAPL Transmissivity standard and he is currently BP's lead LNAPL technical specialist. In this role he has worked to further refine a robust understanding of data collection and analysis challenges and conceptual model development for improved remedy selection and implementation.

Hide this content


Brad Koons, AECOM

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Koons is Currently AECOM NAPL Global Leader. Mr Koons has over 20 year of NAPL related experience and has worked on Coal Tar, Creosote, Refinery, Railroad and Sediment Projects. Advocacy efforts include multiple Interstate Technology Regulatory council, ASTM and international organizational documents. Most recently he was involved with developing guidance for natural source zone depletion through a pilot test and at retail site in Spain.

Hide this content


Roger Lamb, Roger Lamb Consulting

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Lamb has 25 years of experience in design and use of HRSC data sets to improve project outcomes. He has a B.S, in Geology and a M.S. in Urban Environmental Geology.

Hide this content


William Lang, Lang Tool Co.

See Presenter Bio

Bill has 47 years of contracting experience. He founded Lang Land Clearing, Inc. in 1972. The company is in business today performing land clearing work in Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. In 1991 the company designed, built and patented a stump grinder attachment for hydraulic excavators. Although originally intended for the land clearing company's own use a decision was made to put the grinders on the market. Lang Tool Co. was formed to manufacture them. In 1997 Lang Tool Co. was approached by a Texas firm that needed a soil blender attachment to stabilize dredge material from the New York/New Jersey harbor. Lang Tool Co. built the attachments and moved into selling and renting soil mixing equipment. In 2006 Lang Tool Co. began to move into contracting and subcontracting soil mixing work. Soil mixing contracting gradually grew as a share of the tool company's business so that today it is the company's major focus. Lang Tool Co. contracts soil mixing work throughout the United States and Canada. The companies founded by Mr. Lang span three generations as his two sons and a grandson work in them.

Hide this content


Jim Mueller, Provectus Environmental Products, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Dr. Mueller received a BSc Degree in Plant & Soil Science and an MSc Degree in Agronomy/Soil Microbiology from SIU-Carbondale. He received his Ph.D. in Soil Microbiology & Biochemistry/Genetics from Clemson University. He completed Post-Doctoral training at the U.S. EPA Environmental Research Laboratory in Gulf Breeze, Florida. In 1990, Dr. Mueller formed SBP Technologies, Inc. to develop bioremediation technologies and remedial strategies focused on PAHs and CHCs. SBP was sold to The EICON Group, Inc. / Roy F. Weston, Inc. and in June 1997 Dr. Mueller joined the staff of URS Corporation (formerly DAMES & MOORE). In 2003, he created Adventus Americas Inc. which was sold to FMC in November 2011. FMC sold the businesses as PeroxyChem, LLC to One Equity Partners / JP Morgan Chase in March 2014. In April 2014 Dr. Mueller resigned and became President of Provectus Environmental Products, Inc. to develop and commercialize advanced ISCO and ISCR technologies. He has worked on hundreds of remediation projects around the world and has over 500 scientific publications/abstracts which include multiple patents issued/pending.

Hide this content


Bernd W. Rehm, ReSolution Partners

See Presenter Bio

Bernd W. Rehm received a MS in hydrogeology from the University of Waterloo in 1977. After many years in research and consulting with projects ranging from solvents in karst aquifers to mercury in sediments, he and a partner established ReSolution Partners, LLC in 2004. ReSolution Partners' focus on remediation technology extends from treatability studies in the Madison, WI laboratory to remediation design and full-scale implementation with projects across the United States and internationally.

Hide this content


Joshua Richards, Pace Analytical

See Presenter Bio

Joshua Richards is the Program Manager for the Pace Analytical Energy Services division. Joshua leads the sales and technical effort for Pace's Energy Services Laboratory located in Pittsburgh, PA. Joshua has been with Pace for over three years and previously served as an account executive in the Indiana market. Prior to coming to Pace, Josh spent eight years as an assessment/remediation geologist in the consulting industry working for an international consulting firm in multiple offices worldwide. Joshua's professional experience includes management of large scale assessment/ remediation projects and implementation of bioremediation, ISCO, ISTR, as well as complex hydrogeological investigations.Mr. Richards received his BA in Geology from Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis and his MS in Geology from the University of Florida. He is a registered professional geologist in the states of Florida and Indiana. Additionally, Mr. Richards is a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager, a national certification.

Hide this content


Russell Schindler, SampleServe, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Russell Schindler is the founder of SampleServe.com, a company specializing in collecting environmental samples, data automation and environmental reporting. Mr. Schindler also founded Compliance, Inc. an environmental engineering company with offices in Detroit and Traverse City, MI. Russell is a Professional Geologist and a graduate of Western Michigan University and holds 5 patents related to environmental groundwater remediation. Russell is also the founder and host of a monthly technology meetup group in northern Michigan call TCNewTech.org. Russell is also an avid sailboat racer and has completed 13 Chicago to Mackinaw races, 6 Port Huron to Mackinaw races and 3 Super-Mac Races.

Hide this content


Jennifer Simms, Jacobs

See Presenter Bio

Ms. Simms has a bachelor's degree in Environmental Engineering and is a professionally licensed engineer in Pennsylvania. She is a Senior Technologist in Jacobs' Indianapolis office with 16 years of experience in environmental site characterization. Her experience encompasses a variety of groundwater- and soils-related projects with an emphasis on VI investigation and mitigation. She became involved with assessing VI 14 years ago as a field team member on a large residential VI sampling project for EPA Region 2. Since then she has worked on VI projects throughout the United States, and abroad, and as a result she has extensive experience working with federal and state VI guidance documents. Ms. Simms provides technical support on VI and mitigation projects for both federal and commercial clients. Her key responsibilities include developing proposals and work plans, field investigation implementation, and data assessment and reporting. She is also responsible for Jacobs' VI sampling best practices and standard operating procedures (SOPs) and overseeing the training of 50+ staff at Jacobs who perform VI sampling. Her extensive practical experience and depth of understanding about VI complexities, uncertainties, and stakeholder perspectives have expedited the investigative process and resulted in significant cost savings.

Hide this content


Steve Sittler, Patriot Engineering

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Sittler holds a B.S. in Earth Sciences from the University of Indianapolis, an M.S. in Geology from Purdue University, and is a Licensed/Registered Professional Geologist in multiple states. He has more than 34 years of technical experience in applied hydrogeology, with specialized expertise in remedial strategy development and implementation. He has managed and performed more than 1,000 site investigation/remediation projects at industrial facilities, petroleum bulk storage facilities & refineries, and service stations in more than 20 states, and has extensive expertise in remedial strategy development and remedial design and implementation. Mr. Sittler's experience includes hundreds of remediation projects involving both innovative closure strategies, as well as unique applications of conventional technologies for both petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Hide this content


Lauren Soós, TRS Group, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Mrs. Soós has over 15 years of experience in the environmental consulting and remediation industries, focusing on soil and groundwater remediation. About 10 years ago as an environmental engineering consultant, Mr. Soós was exposed to the fast-paced implementation and certainty of in situ thermal remediation (ISTR) and became obsessed with the technology. Shortly after Mrs. Soós joined TRS Group (TRS) and has been directly involved with over a dozen of ISTR projects throughout the United States. As an engineer and project manager in the TRS operations and technical sales teams, she oversees ISTR design, implementation, and operations.

Hide this content


Christopher Thomas, TRS Group, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Mr. Thomas has 27 years of experience in the environmental remediation industry. He has been working exclusively with ISTR technology for 21 years at sites located throughout the United States where Mr. Thomas performed as a project manager and as a senior group leader overseeing field supervisors and technicians. As an in-house technical expert, Mr. Thomas participates in the review of proposals, In Situ Thermal Remediation (ISTR) system designs, work plans, sampling and analysis plans, health and safety plans, and final reports. Mr. Thomas also provides training on the technical aspects of ISTR, including: equipment, operations, maintenance, and electrical controls.

Hide this content


Joel Thompson

See Presenter Bio

Joel has spent over 13 years in the hydrogeology and environmental consulting fields. He's developed expertise in groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling, quantitative analysis of hydrogeologic systems, vadose zone contaminant fate and transport, groundwater monitoring system design, and environmental compliance audits. But his expertise doesn't stop there; he is also well versed in industrial contaminant site investigations and remediation of chemicals from chlorinated solvents, metals, and PCBs to petroleum hydrocarbons and explosives.

Hide this content


Laura Trozzolo, TRC Companies, Inc.

See Presenter Bio

Laura Trozzolo received her B.S. in biology from the University of Notre Dame in 1993 and her M.S. in risk decision analysis from Indiana University in 1995. She is a Senior Human Health Risk Assessor with TRC, where she provides data management and regulatory oversight for human health risk assessment and risk management services for military sites, former Manufactured Gas Plant sites, active and former refineries, as well as railroad derailments and operational sites. In addition, Laura serves as a technical specialist on vapor intrusion issues for TRC, specializing in fate and transport of contaminants in the environment, including PFAS, and currently serves on the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council PFAS and VI Mitigation Team. When she is not working, Laura is wrangling 8-year old twin boys and vaguely remembers enjoying something called "free time".

Hide this content


John Valkenburg, PeroxyChem

See Presenter Bio

John has more than 30 years of industry experience, tracking 5 years as an environmental chemist, 16 years in environmental consulting, and 12 years and running in his current role. He's a professional engineer (Michigan) and a University of Illinois graduate (BS in Dietetics & MS in Environmental Engineering). John and his wife enjoy their 3 horses, dog, and two cats.

Hide this content


Raymond Vaské, AECOM

See Presenter Bio

Raymond Vaské is an engineer and project manager with over 25 years of experience designing and implementing a wide range of physical treatment technologies and in-situ biological treatment technologies for the remediation of soil and groundwater impacted by petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. His experience ranges from the recovery and recycling of over 1,000 pounds of DNAPL PCE (Indianapolis drycleaning plant) to design and construction of a 1,000 gallon-per-minute air stripping system (Superfund site in Indiana) to the injection of bioremediation amendments at sites in Indiana, Kentucky, Vermont, and New York. As a former member of the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SuRF) and contributor to the ITRC Green and Sustainable Remediation Team, Mr. Vaské is a strong advocate for the judicious application of remediation technologies for net environmental benefit.

Hide this content

<TOP>  
UA-42869107-1