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VIRTUAL
SEMINAR

May 20th & 21st, 2020

 

 


Vapor Intrusion, PFAS,
& Risk Communication

 

Due to the current quarantine, MSECA is transitioning our traditional Spring Seminar into an inaugural virtual event. Topics will include Vapor Intrusion, PFAS, and Risk Communications, along with opportunities to discuss the presentations and network with your colleagues. Presentation details are being finalized and the exact agenda will be available soon but some of the presentations will include:

  • The Importance of Sanitary Sewers as the Expected Preferential Pathway in Vapor Intrusion Evaluations
    Craig Cox, Cox-Colvin & Associates

  • SSD Design Integration - Proper Planning for a New Construction Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    Tony McDonald, A-Z Solutions, Inc.

  • Eliminating Risk of PFAS Contamination: Low Cost In Situ Remediation with Colloidal Activated Carbon
    Brett Hicks, Regenesis

  • PFAS: What is it, why does it matter, how do we treat it?
    Angus McGrath & Krista Barfoot, Stantec

  • Eliminating Risk of PFAS Contamination: Low Cost In Situ Remediation with Colloidal Activated Carbon
    Brett Hicks, Regenesis

  • Using High-Resolution Tools and 3-D Visualization and Animation (3-DVA) Technology to Support Environmental Investigations
    Jim Depa, Terracon

  • Risk Communication – Why? When? How?
    Megan Hamilton & Sarah Jonker, Arcadis

  • Risk Communication in the Modern World – Lessons Learned in the Last Decade
    Matthew Bono & Casey McFall, EnviroFroensics

WHEN:

Wednesday, May 20th
8:00am - 1:15pm
Vapor Intrusion & PFAS

Thursday, May 21st
8:00am - 1:15pm
Risk Communication

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MSECA Virtual Seminar Registration:

For our inaugural Virtual Seminar, we are offering registration at a deeply discounted rate to MSECA Members. In addition, any company registering 10 or more attendees will be able to send as many people from their company as they like at one flat rate. Registration will be done by company (rather than by individual) but we can adjust your number of attendees as we get closer to the Seminar. Click the button below to fill out the registration from or if you have any questions, please send us an email at info@mseca.org

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Registration for:

Up to 2
Attendees

Up to 4
Attendees

Up to 9
Attendees

Unlimited
Attendees

MSECA Consultant Member Registration
Check your company's status at:
http://www.mseca.org/MSECA_Members.php
$25.00 $50.00 $75.00 $100.00 
Non-Member Registration
Environmental consulting companies can Join MSECA and receive discounted registration to all our educational events.
$150.00

$275.00

$375.00

$450.00 

MSECA Government Member Registration
Government Members receive discount on registration. (Currently IDEM & Indiana Brownfields are both MSECA Members)
$25.00

$50.00

$75.00

$100.00 

MSECA Student Member Registration
Full time students who join MSECA at our Student Member rate receive complimentary registration for this event.
$0.00

 

 

 

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Virtual Seminar Agenda:


Wednesday, May 20th

  • 8:00am – Virtual Breakfast (via Zoom) 
    Attendees will be randomly divided into groups of 6-12 for an informal opportunity to network and catch-up with one another.

  • 9:00am – Vapor Intrusion Presentations (via GoToWebinar) starting at 9:03am & 9:40am
    • The Importance of Sanitary Sewers as the Expected Preferential Pathway in Vapor Intrusion Evaluations
      Craig Cox, Cox-Colvin & Associates
    • SSD Design Integration - Proper Planning for a New Construction Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
      Tony McDonald, A-Z Solutions, Inc.

  • 10:40am – PFAS Presentations (via GoToWebinar) starting at 10:50am & 11:35am
    • PFAS: What is it, why does it matter, how do we treat it? 
      Angus McGrath & Krista Barfoot, Stantec 
    • Eliminating Risk of PFAS Contamination: Low Cost In Situ Remediation with Colloidal Activated Carbon
      Brett Hicks, Regenesis

  • 12:15pm – Virtual Lunch (via Zoom)
    Attendees will be randomly divided into groups of 6-12 for an opportunity to discuss the day’s presentations. 


Thursday, May 21st

  • 8:00am – Virtual Breakfast (via Zoom)
    Attendees will be randomly divided into groups of 6-12 for an informal opportunity to network and catch-up with one another.

  • 9:00am – Risk Communication Presentations (via GoToWebinar) starting at 9:03am, 10:10am, & 11:15am
    • Risk Communication – Why? When? How?
      Megan Hamilton & Sarah Jonker, Arcadis
    • Using High-Resolution Tools and 3-D Visualization and Animation (3-DVA) Technology to Support Environmental Investigations
      Jim Depa, Terracon
    • Risk Communication in the Modern World – Lessons Learned in the Last Decade
      Matthew Bono & Casey McFall, EnviroFroensics

  • 12:15pm – Virtual Lunch (via Zoom)
    Attendees will be randomly divided into groups of 6-12 for an opportunity to discuss the day’s presentations.


Presentation Descriptions:

Eliminating Risk of PFAS Contamination: Low Cost In Situ Remediation with Colloidal Activated Carbon
Brett Hicks, Regenesis

Colloidal activated carbon is emerging as a low cost in situ method to eliminate the risk associated with PFAS in groundwater. PFAS as a group are not amenable to destructive biodegradation. The retardation of migrating species by colloidal activated carbon is therefore finite – albeit variable with carbon dose, placement dimensions, and the concentration, nature and mix of the PFAS species. Retardation factors in the order of thousands may be secured using colloidal activated carbon placements representing a fraction of soil mass in the order of 0.001 to 0.01 (a similar range to natural foc.) Impact on groundwater flow is therefore negligible. Colloidal carbon isotherm data and sorption test data are presented for specific PFAS compounds indicating excellent sorption capability and increased performance with decreasing carbon particle size. The potential for competitive sorption/elution is discussed. Plume modeling is presented indicating longevity of in situ colloidal carbon treatment for PFAS to be on the order of multiple decades before reapplication is required. Data are presented from actual field case sites where a single application of colloidal activated carbon resulted in orders of magnitude reduction in PFAS groundwater concentrations to below USEPA health advisory levels. Design considerations for plume management are discussed including amending existing pump & treat systems to reduce project cost and to eliminate down-gradient risk to public health.

Risk Communication – Why? When? How?
Megan Hamilton & Sarah Jonker, Arcadis

Explaining difficult scientific concepts relating to human health risk exposure can be a tricky task, even when communicating within the environmental consulting realm. As environmental consultants and practitioners, we often find ourselves in situations where we also need to communicate these concepts to the community and third-party property owners. It is not uncommon for the majority of surrounding communities to have little to no understanding of environmental investigation and remediation activities or knowledge of exposure pathways and the risk factors associated with those pathways. Initial introduction to these concepts, coupled with the fact that these community members may be potentially affected, can create feelings of fear, anger, distrust, and result in very high emotional situations. Implementing the right tool at the right time can help to alleviate some of these issues. This is where risk communication skills and tools become your best friend.

In this presentation, we will go over key elements to risk communication, including why risk communication is important, when risk communication should be implemented, and how to implement risk communication methods. Many tools and methods are available for use depending on the specific scenario in which you may find yourself. We will walk through a variety of examples that will cover client communication, one on one communication with community members, and larger public forums, such as community meetings.

Risk Communication in the Modern World – Lessons Learned in the Last Decade
Matthew Bono & Casey McFall, EnviroFroensics

Advances in social technology have made information (and misinformation) readily available to the public, more so in the last 10 years than ever before. As a result, perceptions and understandings of risk are being influenced by both reliable and not-so-reliable sources. EnviroForensics will provide an overview of the changing landscape in risk communication and will share techniques on how to convey complex scientific concepts to non-scientists. We will then discuss several real-life case studies that can serve as learning opportunities for our professional community.

SSD Design Integration - Proper Planning for a New Construction Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
Tony McDonald, A-Z Solutions, Inc.

Proper planning is key to ensure the VI system will align with the architect’s vision as well as achieve the functionality desired by the environmental professional. The process starts with the architect.

Preparing for the upcoming build by including the SSD system components in the draft documents ensures that the project will include the VI system in the production schedule.

This class is designed to take the environmental professional through the design and construction process by using a case study approach. The object is to educate the environmental consultant on the pitfalls poor planning can lead to and how to avoid them in your next new construction project.

The Importance of Sanitary Sewers as the Expected Preferential Pathway in Vapor Intrusion Evaluations
Craig Cox, Cox-Colvin & Associates, Inc.

In general, Vapor Intrusion (VI) assessments can be thought of as a three-legged stool, with each leg representing a contributing source that must be understood:

  1. contributions associated with soil gas,
  2. contributions associated with indoor sources, and
  3. contributions associated with preferential pathways.

Until recently, most assessment efforts (and modeling) have focused understanding the contributions from soil gas and the contributions from indoor air. Contributions from preferential pathways is rarely evaluated in a rigorous manner. When you consider that a sanitary sewer is essentially an air-filled conduit providing a direct vapor pathway into every inhabited building, more often than not, the sanitary sewer will be the preferential pathway of concern. Not understanding this pathway can lead to a misdiagnosis of the issues and implementation of ineffective mitigation efforts.

Using High-Resolution Tools and 3-D Visualization and Animation (3-DVA) Technology to Support Environmental Investigations
Jim Depa, Terracon

High-Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) tools and 3-D Visualization and Animation (3-DVA) technology are being utilized more often than ever to reduce the costs of environmental liabilities caused by chemical spills and releases. HRSC tools provide a variety of detailed data about the subsurface geologic setting of a site as well as the magnitude and distribution of chemical contaminants in the subsurface.

Although nearly a dozen different types of HRSC tools exist, four specific tools have relevance to contamination caused by petroleum and/or solvent releases. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tools can detect the presence of free-phase non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in the subsurface, such as crude oil or gasoline. A Membrane Interface Probe (MIP) can detect both residual contamination on soil and dissolved contamination in groundwater from volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), and Cone Penetrometer Tests (CPT) and Hydraulic Profiling Tools (HPT) can classify the geologic and hydrogeologic setting of a site in high-resolution. This information can aid in characterization and remediation of a site by identifying lower permeable soils acting as storage units for contaminants or higher permeable units acting as subsurface migration pathways.

While advanced into the subsurface, HRSC tools typically collect several types of data every 0.07 feet, therefore, one boring to thirty feet in depth typically generates over 1,000 data points, and a single day of HRSC drilling routinely generates over 10,000 data points. 3-DVA technology is perfectly suited to handle the massive amount of data produced by HRSC tools. Additionally, 3-DVA technology can visualize the data in a way that clients, contractors, regulatory agencies, and all project stakeholders can understand.


Presenter Bios:

Craig Cox, Cox-Colvin & Associates, Inc.

Craig Cox currently serves as President and Principal Scientist for Cox-Colvin & Associates, Inc, and is responsible for providing managerial and technical oversight on major environmental projects conducted by the firm under RCRA,CERCLA, and Brownfield programs. Cox-Colvin & Associates, Inc., founded in 1995, provides environmental consulting services to public and private sector clients throughout the United States. Mr. Cox began his environmental consulting career in 1987 with Geraghty & Miller, Inc, (Arcadis) where he became the firm’s Midwest Regional Manager of CERCLA projects. Mr. Cox is the inventor of the Vapor Pin®, a sub-slab soil gas sampling device, and is the primary architect of a variety of environmental database applications, including Data Inspector™. Mr. Cox received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology and Mineralogy from The Ohio State University and a Professional Degree in Hydrogeology from the Colorado School of Mines. Mr. Cox is a Certified Professional under Ohio EPA’s Voluntary Action Program and a co-author of “Background Metals Concentrations in Ohio Soils” (1996) and a contributing author on reports concerning background metals concentrations published by Ohio EPA.

Brett Hicks, Regenesis

Mr. Hicks has over ten years of experience in the environmental field in the areas of site investigation, project management, risk assessment, and technical assistance. He received his undergraduate degree in biology from Ball State University. Mr. Hicks currently serves as the Ohio Valley District Manager with Regenesis, where he provides technical support for the design and application of soil and groundwater remediation and vapor intrusion mitigation technology solutions. Mr. Hicks work directly with environmental consulting, construction, and engineering firms to develop successful remedial approaches by offering design, application, and performance review expertise for in-situ applied remedial strategies across a broad spectrum of technology classes.

Tony McDonald, A-Z Solutions, Inc.

Tony has been an essential part of A-Z Solutions, Inc. success for over 20 years. His designs and systems have been successfully operating at numerous facilities in the plastics, auto, tire/rubber and aviation manufacturing industries for over two decades.

Currently, Mr. McDonald serves as President of Operations and acts as Senior Project Manager for the Companies’ vapor intrusion mitigation projects. In this role he is responsible for overseeing the custom design process that each project requires. He oversees the SSD system installations to ensure every component meets A-Z Solutions rigorous quality and safety standards. Tony’s leadership and innovative SSD system designs have enabled A-Z Solutions, Inc. to become the premier name in vapor intrusion mitigation.

In addition to his work in the field, Tony has gained a solid reputation as teacher, lecturer, and policy advocate. As a past member of the AARST Board of Directors, he was instrumental in shaping national vapor intrusion remediation guidelines nationwide. Tony is widely regarded as an expert in his field and has had the honor of being a featured speaker/lecturer for the 2018 International Radon Symposium in Myrtle Beach South Carolina. He has also served as a lecturer/educator for several local and state health departments, state legislatures, EPA, business organizations, consulting firms and public interest forums.

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